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1st CCAFRICA-AU/IBAR African Experts Group Meeting on Fish and Fishery Products in Preparation for the 34th Session of the Codex Committee on Fish and Fishery Products (CCFFP)

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Towards Formulating Common African Position 

© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the Expert meeting to review reports on Codex Committee on Fish and Fishery Products and Fruits and Vegetables, 14-16 September 2015; Nairobi, Kenya.© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the Expert meeting to review reports on Codex Committee on Fish and Fishery Products and Fruits and Vegetables, 14-16 September 2015; Nairobi, Kenya.Globalization, mainly driven by international trade, has made food to be traded internationally in a reasonably short time through complex production and distribution networks. Although international trade in food has to an extent made some food cheaper, consumers have increasingly become more vulnerable to food safety hazards. Countries demand that food produced, marketed and consumed conforms to set standards in order to protect their citizens (consumer protection). However, such standards can become barriers to production and trade for several commodities where production systems and markets differ between countries. Despite this, food safety is important. The Codex Alimentarius Commission, established by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO) in 1963 developed harmonized international food standards, guidelines and codes of practice to protect the health of the consumers and ensure fair practices in the food trade.

Fish trade benefits African countries through generating revenues, creating job opportunities and enhancing food security. The scale and value of these benefits depends on post-harvest handling and value-addition to products. Food safety and quality standards are important aspects that affect the volume and value of fish products accessible to regional and international markets. Coherent continental positions validated by scientific evidences will enable Africa ensure appropriate standards are set to facilitate the continent’s fish and fishery products have access to markets.

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Regional Consultative Workshop on Environmental Management for Sustainable Aquaculture Development in Eastern Africa and The Great Lakes Region

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© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at Regional Consultative Workshop on Environmental Management for Sustainable Aquaculture Development in Eastern Africa and The Great Lakes Region, 27-30 August, Kampala, Uganda.© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at Regional Consultative Workshop on Environmental Management for Sustainable Aquaculture Development in Eastern Africa and The Great Lakes Region, 27-30 August, Kampala, Uganda.27-30 August, Kampala, Uganda. A key pillar in the Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa is the promotion of sustainable aquaculture development. The policy objective of this policy arena is to jumpstart market-led sustainable aquaculture through a variety of strategies and where appropriate support interventionist development approaches in aquaculture supported by strong strategic implementation plans.

For sustainable aquaculture development, there is need to develop and implement strategic sectoral environment management approaches that do not just focus at the farm level but to also factor in the wider environment. Sustainable environmental management for aquaculture would enable African Union Member States make more realistic and appropriate aquaculture development plans, approve appropriate projects and institute environmental management practices more effectively. Taking into consideration regional specificities, formulation of regional environmental management frameworks for sustainable aquaculture development should ideally be developed at regional levels. Thus the ultimate objective of these actvities is the formulation of regional environmental management frameworks in the five regions of the continent (West, Central, East, Southern and North) to support sustainable aquaculture development.

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Coordination Meeting for Non State Actors in Fisheries and Aquaculture Sector in Africa

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© 2015 AU-IBAR. Presentation of the outcome of Inventory of NSAs in AU member states by MS Hellen Moepi.© 2015 AU-IBAR. Presentation of the outcome of Inventory of NSAs in AU member states by MS Hellen Moepi.Nairobi, Kenya August 6-8, 2015 - Non States Actor are organizations with sufficient power to influence and bring about change in the community; even though they do not belong to any established institution of a state. They are therefore fundamental in ensuring the sustainable development of fisheries and aquaculture in Africa. Their importance was recognised by the second conference of African Ministers of fisheries and aquaculture (CAMFA II) who urged African Union, RECs and Member States ‘‘to facilitate the participation of non-state actors in fisheries and aquaculture decision-making processes”.

The African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR), in collaboration with NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency (NPCA) with financial support from the European Union, organized a coordination meeting for Non State Actors (NSAs) organizations’ in the fisheries and aquaculture sector in Africa on 6-8 August 2015 in Nairobi, Kenya.

The main objective of this meeting was to develop a framework for effective coordination of the NSAs activities and participations in fisheries management and decision-making process at regional and national levels in Africa.

The Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for fisheries and aquaculture in Africa underscores the need for empowering Non-State Actors (NSAs) and the development of an advocacy strategy to enhance the participation of stakeholders for inclusive decision-making in fisheries and aquaculture in Africa.