Current Programmes and Projects

ISCTRC

Print

Press Release - Commemorating 70 Years of Trypanosomiasis Research and Control in Africa at the 35th ISCTRC General Conference

on .

18th September, 2019, Nairobi, Kenya

Trypanosomiasis is a major disease affecting human and animals in 38 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. Its effect on animal and human health is known to have direct impact on livestock productivity, livestock management and human settlement; through those direct impacts, the disease has indirect impacts on crop agriculture and human welfare. Changes in livestock management, human settlement and crop agriculture also result in changes in land use, vegetation cover and environment and human welfare. All of these have implications for resource use patterns, and investments in natural capital. With a wealth of evidence on the extent of the tsetse, human and animal trypanosomiasis problem, the opportunity for researchers and experts from a mix of disciplines to meet and put this evidence into clear perspective is both timely and invaluable. The International Scientific Council for Trypanosomiasis Research and Control (ISCTRC), a statutory Council of the African Union Commission will provide the scientific arena to enable this important discussion, including, review control strategies and recommendations for appropriate smarter methods of tsetse and trypanosomiasis
control, at its 35th General Conference. The ISCTRC shall also be commemorating its 70th year of existence.

Following 34 successful conferences, the 35th ISCTRC will be held in Abuja, Nigeria, from 23rd – 27th September 2019. The theme for this year is Impact of African Trypanosomiasis on Human and Animal Health, Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development in the face of challenges to sustainable investment in Animal African Trypanosomiasis (AAT) control and Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) elimination. The theme builds upon the 34th Conference that was held in Livingstone, Zambian that focused on ‘Capitalizing on the progress made against human and animal trypanosomiases – the way forward in partnership with all stakeholders.’ This year, the Conference will be hosted by the Government of Nigeria, thus providing an opportunity for the Federal Government of Nigeria to showcase its fight against tsetse and trypanosomiasis in Africa.

The biennial conference is jointly organized by the African Union InterAfrican Bureau for Animal Resources, (as the Secretariat of the International Scientific Council for Trypanosomiasis Research and Control), the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) and the Federal Government of Nigeria. For 70 years, since 1949, the Council has achieved its mandate of facilitating information sharing and exchange on matters regarding tsetse and trypanosomiasis research and control by holding regular biennial General Scientific Conferences.

Print

The International Scientific Council for Trypanosomosis Research and Control Holds it’s 34th Conference to Review and Recommend Control Approaches for Sleeping Sickness and Nagana

on .

© 2017 AU-IBAR. The International Scientific Council for Trypanosomosis Research and Control Holds it’s 34th Conference to Review and Recommend Control Approaches for Sleeping Sickness and Nagana.© 2017 AU-IBAR. The International Scientific Council for Trypanosomosis Research and Control Holds it’s 34th Conference to Review and Recommend Control Approaches for Sleeping Sickness and Nagana.Livingstone 11th September 2017. To address sleeping sickness, Nagana (trypanosomiasis in cattle) and the vector that transmits the diseases, stakeholders comprising disease control workers and scientists from AU Members States, researchers and scientists from universities in Africa and other parts of the world and other organisation working on the disease in human and animals and the tsetse fly are meeting in Livingstone Zambia to promote information sharing on the problem of tsetse, human and animal trypanosomiasis, review control strategies and recommend appropriate approaches in research and control.

The recommendations emanating from the Conference will provide new information necessary for smarter methods of tsetse and trypanosomiasis control. It is as a result of previous such Conferences that information on improving control of tsetse and trypanosomiasis has been acquired and has benefitted many countries on the continent and the world over, resulting in improved livelihoods especially of the rural communities where the problem has the highest impacts.

The threat that tsetse and trypanosomiasis (T&T) pose was recognized at the turn of the 20th century by the African Heads of State and Governments when, at their meeting in Lome in 2000, drew attention to the seriousness of the T&T problem as one of Africa’s greatest constraints to socio-economic development, that severely affects human and livestock health, limits land use, cause poverty and perpetuates underdevelopment on the continent.