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About PACE

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The PACE programme was the successor of the earlier Joint Programme No. 15 (JP15) (1962-1976) and the Pan African Rinderpest Campaign (PARC, 1986-1998) projects, aimed at eradicating rinderpest from Africa. The evaluation of PARC undertaken in 1996 recommended a continuation of the programme and subsequently, various preparatory and formulation missions were undertaken during 1997 and 1998.

This culminated in the formulation of PACE. The main objective of the Programme was to consolidate the achievements of rinderpest eradication and take further steps in the control major epizootic diseases. The ultimate goal of PACE was to contribute to poverty alleviation of the African livestock producers.
Considering the importance of PACE outputs, an extension of the Programme for a period of two years was recommended, starting at the end of October 2004.

The spirit of the PACE programme was in compliance with the orientations of the new cooperation agreements between Europe and the ACP Countries (Cotonou Agreements).

The Programme was in harmony with up to date animal health and economic interests in terms of globalisation and catered for capacity building and the development of veterinary services and food hygiene services in Africa so as to ensure their compliance with international standards as defined by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).

The Community-based Animal Health and Participatory Epidemiology (CAPE, 2000-2004) project – funded by DFID was an integral part of PACE.

Rationale

The PACE programme was a major development programme financed by the European Development Fund (EDF) in the field of animal health in Africa covering 32 African countries. The programme aimed at building upon the headway made in the campaign against rinderpest in order to establish lower-cost national and continental epidemio-surveillance networks, for the main animal diseases, provide the countries with the capacities needed to organise economically and technically justified control programmes and develop the effective and sustainable distribution of veterinary products and services.

The programme included national operations planned and implemented in each country and also sub-regional and regional support and co-ordination components. PACE was coordinated by AU-IBAR. The organisational chart of the PACE included a Programme Coordination Unit in Nairobi, Kenya and two regional coordination Units in Bamako, Mali for West and Central Africa and Nairobi, Kenya for Eastern Africa. The PACE programme therefore offered a firm basis for eradicating rinderpest from Africa and controlling other major diseases.

 

The PACE programme was the successor of the earlier Joint Programme No. 15 (JP15) (1962-1976) and the Pan African Rinderpest Campaign (PARC, 1986-1998) projects, aimed at eradicating rinderpest from Africa. The evaluation of PARC undertaken in 1996 recommended a continuation of the programme and subsequently, various preparatory and formulation missions were undertaken during 1997 and 1998.

This culminated in the formulation of PACE.  The main objective of the Programme was to consolidate the achievements of rinderpest eradication and take further steps in the control major epizootic diseases. The ultimate goal of PACE was to contribute to poverty alleviation of the African livestock producers.

Considering the importance of PACE outputs,  an extension of the Programme for a period of two years was recommended, starting at the end of October 2004.

The spirit of the PACE programme was in compliance with the orientations of the new cooperation agreements between Europe and the ACP Countries (Cotonou Agreements).

The Programme was in harmony with up to date animal health and economic interests in terms of globalisation and catered for capacity building and the development of veterinary services and food hygiene services in Africa so as to ensure their compliance with international standards as defined by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

The Community-based Animal Health and Participatory Epidemiology (CAPE, 2000-2004) project – funded by DFID was an integral part of PACE.

Rationale

The PACE programme was a major development programme financed by the European Development Fund (EDF) in the field of animal health in Africa covering 32 African countries. The programme aimed at building upon the headway made in the campaign against rinderpest in order to establish lower-cost national and continental epidemio-surveillance networks, for the main animal diseases, provide the countries with the capacities needed to organise economically and technically justified control programmes and develop the effective and sustainable distribution of veterinary products and services.
The programme included national operations planned and implemented in each country and also sub-regional and regional support and co-ordination components. PACE was coordinated by AU-IBAR.  The organisational chart of the PACE included a Programme Coordination Unit in Nairobi, Kenya and two regional coordination Units in Bamako, Mali for West and Central Africa and Nairobi, Kenya for Eastern Africa. The PACE programme therefore offered a firm basis for eradicating rinderpest from Africa and controlling other major diseases.