Current Programmes and Projects

SMP-AH

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Uganda to Rollout Standards, Methods and Procedures to Primary Animal Diseases

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© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the National SMPs Roll-out workshop for Uganda held at Ridar Hotel 20-22 July 2015.© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the National SMPs Roll-out workshop for Uganda held at Ridar Hotel 20-22 July 2015.Uganda is ready to introduce and enforce Standard Methods and Procedures (SMPs) for primary diseases, including FMD, PPR, RVF and brucellosis across the country. This has been disclosed at a national workshop, convened in Kampala, from 20th to 22nd July 2015.

Revising the status of livestock diseases and delivery of veterinary services in the districts and zones, workshop participants requested the Government of Uganda and AU-IBAR/SMP-AH project to strengthen coordination between Uganda and the neighboring countries in diseases surveillance and quarantine and devise a mechanism to build public awareness in the area of veterinary regulation. They also flagged up the need for strengthening vaccination programmes in border areas, especially along the Uganda-Tanzania border. Finally, participants requested the Ministry to speed up the adoption and implementation of SMPs in the country through supplying of veterinary vaccines, establishing quarantine facilities, increasing provision of logistical supports to districts and ensuring a two way information sharing among key stakeholders in the sector.

In his welcoming address to over 55 workshop participants, Dr Nicholas Kauta, Director of Animal Resources (DAR) for Uganda lamented the fact that Africa’s participation in the global livestock trade has remained less than 2% of the global share and commended stakeholders’ determination to rollout SMP in the nation to improve this gloomy situation. Besides, Dr Kauta has highlighted the significant contribution the SMP-AH project has made so far to enhance Uganda’s livestock trade.

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Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan further strengthen cross-border collaboration and coordination of animal health programs within the Karamoja cluster

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© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the Trilateral Cross-border Meeting for Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan at Moroto, Uganda, 16th to 18th June 2015.© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the Trilateral Cross-border Meeting for Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan at Moroto, Uganda, 16th to 18th June 2015.Recognizing the challenges facing inhabitants of the “Karamoja Cluster”, Kenya and Uganda negotiated and signed a “Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)” in 2013. The cross border animal health initiative was intended to encompass and synchronize animal health legislation and policy enforcement interventions undertaken in a coordinated manner. As a common practice, Kenya, Uganda and South Sudan normally, cooperate and collaborate in various activities within the frameworks of the treaties that established the EAC and IGAD. To further develop the MoU for Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan to strengthen cross-border collaboration and coordination of animal health programs within the Karamoja cluster, AU-IBAR in partnership with IGAD/ICPALD and FAO organized a cross-border meeting for Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan at Moroto from 16th to 18th June 2015 under the auspices of the Standard Methods and procedures in Animal Health project. The meeting attracted 42 participants from Uganda, Kenya, South Sudan, AU-IBAR, IGAD/ICPALD, FAO Uganda, FAO Kenya, FAO South Sudan, FAO-ECTAD, ACTED, VSF Belgium, Dan Church AID and Caritas Uganda.

In his welcome remarks, Dr Solomon Munyua, Acting Director of the IGAD Centre for Pastoral Areas and Livestock Development (ICPALD) pointed that people in cross-border areas in the Karamoja cluster depended on livestock for their livelihood, a fact that justified putting a human face on the strategies outlined in the MoU. He advised MS to embrace other resources in the Arid and Semi-arid lands in addition to livestock, and encouraged the MS to domesticate the MoU with legal language applicable to respective countries.

In his opening remarks, on behalf of the Director of African Union Interafrican Bureau for Animal Resources – Prof. Ahmed Elsawalhy, Dr Joseph Magona thanked ICPALD, FAO and Uganda Government for their participation in organizing the workshop. He stated implementing the Standard Methods and Procedures in Animal Health project in the region was intended to support harmonization and coordination of the control of trade-related transboundary animal diseases (TADs). The project had in the recent past organized regional cross-border meetings to strengthen collaboration between countries regarding disease surveillance, information sharing, disease control and regional cooperation. He recognized efforts made by IGAD and FAO in 2013 that led to development of the MoU between Uganda and Kenya to improve disease control and conflict resolution in cross-border areas along the Uganda-Kenya border. He further recognized recent efforts made under SMPAH project together with partners that initiated development of the MoU between Kenya and Ethiopia along their common border. He concluded by stressing that the cross-border meeting for Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan was intended to enhance cross-border coordination among Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan, especially regarding control of TADs within the Karamoja cluster.

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A Community-Based Grassroot Disease Reporting System Initiated in South Sudan

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© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the national workshop for creating a community-based grassroot disease reporting system for South Sudan at James Hotel, Juba, 4-5 June 2015.© 2015 AU-IBAR. Participants at the national workshop for creating a community-based grassroot disease reporting system for South Sudan at James Hotel, Juba, 4-5 June 2015.The Standard Methods and Procedures in Animal Health (SMP-AH) Project held a national workshop in Juba from 4th to 5th June 2015 to initiate and promote a community-based grassroot disease reporting system for South Sudan. Its main aim was to enhance passive surveillance of transboundary animal diseases through improving disease recognition coupled with strengthening disease reporting by grassroots livestock stakeholders. The workshop brought together key players from the public and private sector engaged in the delivery of animal health services. Past community-based animal health programmes successfully implemented in South Sudan were reviewed in light of the existing Government structure for delivery of veterinary services. A model community-based grassroot disease reporting system was then proposed. A total of 23 participants drawn from the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries, State Ministry of Animal Resources and Fisheries, Wildlife Services, pharmaceutical companies, ICRC, VSF – SUISSE, AU-IBAR and IGAD attended the workshop.

In his remarks, Dr Joseph Magona, on behalf of the Director, AU-IBAR, Prof. Ahmed Elsawalhy, thanked the Government of South Sudan in general and the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries in particular in organizing the workshop for creating a community-based grassroot disease reporting system. He noted that transboundary animal diseases (TADs) continue to affect livestock production and trade in the region. There was need therefore to enhance passive surveillance as a means of tackling TADs. He encouraged all livestock stakeholders in South Sudan to participate in disseminating and promoting the use of the syndromic manual in order to improve disease recognition at the grassroots. He reiterated that through such a system, grassroots stakeholders including livestock keepers could send disease reports to community animal health workers, field veterinarians, private vets operating drug shops, and in general the entire disease control system to allow prompt disease response.

In his opening remarks, Dr Aluma Araba, on behalf of the Director General of Veterinary Services for South Sudan, pointed out the importance of the SMP-AH project in supporting the people and the Government of South Sudan in livestock activities. He recognized efforts made by the SMP-AH project in supporting South Sudanese citizens in training on management skills, laboratory diagnostic techniques, disease surveillance and quarantine management. He encouraged all stakeholders to embrace a community-based animal health programme, given past success in South Sudan especially during the eradication of Rinderpest.